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Contact Lenses

The Future Of Contact Lenses

Most of us are familiar with the standard function of contact lenses: to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. But recent academic reports present a glimpse into the future of contact lenses, and how they’re going beyond replacing prescription eyeglasses.

Myopia Control

In 2019, the FDA approved the first soft contact lenses designed to slow the progression of myopia (nearsightedness) in children. These innovative contact lenses are multifocal and have been shown to be safe and effective in children as young as 8 years old.

What implications does this have in the eye care world?

Widespread use of contact lenses for myopia management could eventually reduce the number of people with high levels of myopia and, consequently, decrease the amount of myopia-related ocular disease in the future.

From the optometrists’ perspective, innovations like multifocal contact lenses encourage eye doctors to stay on top of emerging technologies and research, and incorporate them into routine eye exams.

Managing Ocular Diseases

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, and new contact lens technology that is available in some parts of the world is helping patients manage their condition.

These cutting-edge contacts use microelectronic technology to continuously monitor the wearer’s inner eye pressure — crucial information for glaucoma patients.

Scientists are also currently developing contact lenses that release lubricants onto the surface of the eye to treat dry eye syndrome.

Eye Allergies

You may have experienced the irritation, redness, itchiness and watery eyes that accompany eye allergies. Relief may be found in a new type of contact lens that contains a slow-release drug-delivery system. These contact lenses are available in Japan and Canada, where they have already been approved for use, and have been shown to significantly reduce patients’ eye allergy symptoms for up to 12 hours.

Many of the contact lenses mentioned above are still in their testing phases and aren’t yet available to the public in most countries. However, myopia management contact lenses are widely available in the United States, so speak with your optometrist for more information.

The hope for a clearer and brighter future is strong with these innovative medical devices.

Our optometric team stays up-to-date with emerging research and technologies for optimal patient care. To schedule your eye exam, call Vision MD Eye Doctors in Glenn Dale today!

At Vision MD Eye Doctors, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 301-779-0844 or book an appointment online to see one of our Glenn Dale eye doctors.

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Q&A:

How often do you need an eye exam?

It’s recommended that adults have a comprehensive eye exam every 1-2 years, and annually after the age of 65. If you wear glasses or are at risk of developing any eye conditions, your eye doctor may recommend more frequent exams.

Who is a candidate for myopia management contact lenses?

Nearsighted children aged 8 and up, teens and young adults with mild to moderate myopia are candidates for myopia management. Speak with one of our staff members to determine whether myopia management is right for you or your child.

Multifocal Contact Lenses For People Over 40

If your 40th birthday has come and gone, you may have started to notice some changes in your vision. You might find yourself holding written material further away from your face in order to clearly read the fine print, or have a harder time adjusting your focus from distant objects to near ones.

The inability to see things clearly at various distances can be frustrating.   

Fortunately, this problem can be solved by wearing multifocal contact lenses. Below, we’ll explain the cause and symptoms of presbyopia, along with the many benefits of wearing multifocal contact lenses.

What Is Presbyopia? 

Presbyopia is the natural and gradual loss of your eyes’ ability to focus on near objects. 

The crystalline lens in your eye focuses light onto the retina, and it adapts its shape depending on what you focus on. From infancy until your late 30s or early 40s, the lens is usually clear, thin and very flexible, allowing fast adjustments for sharp vision at all distances.

From age 40-50 the lens becomes considerably thicker and much less flexible. This makes it harder for the lens to change shape and to accurately refract light when focusing on near objects. 

This farsightedness can be easily corrected with reading glasses, bifocal or multifocal glasses, monovision contact lenses, as well as multifocal contact lenses. 

Multifocal Contact Lenses for Presbyopia

Multifocal contact lenses contain multiple lens powers to provide vision correction for different visual zones so you can clearly see objects that are in the distance, nearby and everything in between. 

Certain multifocal contact lenses have 2 lens powers (bifocals), for near and distance vision, and others have a more gradual power change, similar to progressive lenses. These contact lenses can be made using soft materials or rigid gas-permeable materials, and are available as daytime or extended night-wear lenses. 

Note that multifocal contact lenses are not perfect for all situations and some patients may need to try several brands or designs before finding one that works well for them. To spare you the confusion, your eye doctor will guide you towards the ones best suited to your eyes and lifestyle needs. 

To discover options beyond reading glasses, call Vision MD Eye Doctors in Glenn Dale to schedule your contact lens consultation today!

Q&A: 

#1: Are there any “cons” related to wearing multifocal contact lenses? 

Many multifocal contact lenses use a “simultaneous vision” design that allows seeing far and near simultaneously through concentric zones. Some people have problems adapting to this, noticing hazy vision and less contrast than single vision lenses. You can ask your eye doctor to be fit with multifocal lenses and get a test run” or trial period.  

#2: When does presbyopia stabilize?

Most people will start to develop age-related vision changes starting in their early to mid-40s. At around 60 years of age, your eyesight will begin to stabilize and you’ll notice less of a need to update your lens prescription. Nonetheless, yearly comprehensive eye exams at this age are more important than ever, as they enable your eye doctor to detect potential eye conditions and diseases early on. 

Are Contact Lenses Safe For Young Children?

Here’s a question we often get at our practice: Is my child too young for contact lenses?’ This is an important question, and the answer may surprise you.

For children with myopia (nearsightedness), contact lenses can be a convenient method of vision correction. It allows kids to go about their day without having to worry about breaking or misplacing their glasses, and enables them to freely participate in sports and other physical activities.

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Some children and young teens may ask their parents for contact lenses because they feel self-conscious wearing glasses. Contact lenses may even provide children with the confidence boost they need to come out of their shell. Moreover, these days, it is very popular for children to wear single-use one-day disposable soft contacts, since there is no cleaning or maintenance involved.

Some parents may deny their child’s request for contacts due to concerns about eye health and safety. There’s no reason to worry: contact lenses are just as safe for children as they are for anyone else.

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Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Glenn Dale eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

At Vision MD Eye Doctors, we provide children, teens, and patients of all ages with a wide variety of contact lenses. If you’re concerned about the safety of contacts for your child, we’ll be happy to explain and explore ways to ensure maximum safety, optimal eye health and comfort. To learn more or to schedule a pediatric eye exam for contact lenses, contact us today.

What Are the Risks of Having My Child Wear Contact Lenses?

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A study published in the January 2021 issue of The Journal of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics found that kids aren’t at a higher risk of experiencing contact lens complications.

The study followed nearly 1000 children aged 8-16 over the course of 1.5-3 years to determine how contact lenses affected their eye health.

The results indicate that age doesn’t have an effect on contact lens safety. In fact, the researchers found that the risk of developing infections or other adverse reactions was less than 1% per year of wear — which is comparable to contact lens wearers of other ages.

But before you decide that contact lenses are right for your child, you may want to consider whether your child is ready to wear them. During his or her eye doctor’s appointment, the optometrist may ask about your child’s level of maturity, responsibility, and personal hygiene. Since many children are highly motivated to wear contacts, they tend to display real maturity in caring for their lenses. That said, in the initial stages, parents may need to play an active role, as their child gets used to inserting and removing the new contact lenses.

It’s important to note that just as with any other medical device, contact lenses are not risk-free. Anyone who wears contact lenses has a chance of developing eye infections or other complications with contact lenses. However, when worn and cared for according to your eye doctor’s instructions, contact lenses are low-risk and perfectly safe for children and teenagers.

So, go ahead and bring your child in for a contact lens consultation! We’ll help determine if your child is ready for contacts and answer any questions you or your child may have. To schedule your child’s contact lens fitting or eye exam, contact Vision MD Eye Doctors in Glenn Dale today.

Call Vision MD Eye Doctors on 301-779-0844 to schedule an eye exam with our Glenn Dale optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Just in case you missed them, here are some of our previous blog posts :

Is Your Baby’s EyeSight Developing Normally?

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New To Contact Lenses? Here Are Our Top 5 Tips!

For an estimated 56 million North Americans, contact lenses are the preferred form of vision correction. So if you’ve just started wearing contact lenses — you’re in good company.

Advice About Contact Lenses from Glenn Dale Eye Doctor: Dr. Saya Nagori Here are 5 tips to quickly help you adjust to wearing and caring for your new lenses so you can enjoy the many benefits they offer.”

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Learn How to Tell if Your Contact Lens Is Inside Out

This is a common mistake many beginners make when inserting soft contacts. Place the lens on your index fingertip and look carefully at its shape. The edge of the lens should be pointing upwards, like the rim of a teacup. If the edge is flared outward like a blooming flower, the lens is inside out.

Some contact lenses have tiny laser markings of numbers or letters. If the numbers/letters read correctly when you hold the lens on your fingertip, they are properly oriented and the lens is ready to be inserted.

Never Use a Substitute for Contact Lens Solution

Your eye doctor will recommend the appropriate contact lens solution to suit your eyes and lenses. Some people have sensitivities and not all lens solutions are the same.

Even if you run out of contact lens solution, don’t be tempted to rinse your lenses with water, and never use saliva to moisten or clean them.

Using substances other than the recommended contact lens solution to rinse or rewet your contacts can introduce harmful microbes to the eye and cause a serious infection. That’s why it’s best to remove your contacts before showering, swimming, or any other time they might get wet.

Vision MD Eye Doctors Eye Clinic and Contact Lenses, Eye Care and Eye Doctors in Glenn Dale, MD

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Glenn Dale eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

If Your Contact Lenses Feel Uncomfortable, Take Them Out!

Some newcomers mistakenly think that if their contacts feel uncomfortable or gritty, they simply need to “get used to them.” Contact lenses are supposed to be comfortable, so if you are experiencing discomfort there may be something wrong.

With clean fingers, remove your contacts and rinse them, inside and out, with the solution or rewetting drops as recommended by your eye doctor. Dust or dirt could have gotten stuck between the lens and your eye, causing irritation. Flushing the lenses with contact lens solution will help remove the irritant.

If your eyes still feel irritated, don’t place the contact lenses back in your eyes. Instead, wait until they are no longer red or irritated, and try inserting them again. If the problem persists, contact your eye doctor.

Wear Contact Lens-Friendly Makeup

Wearing makeup around the eyes can be a source of irritation and infection whether you wear contact lenses or not. Here’s what we recommend when it comes to eye makeup and contact lenses:

Choose hypoallergenic makeup.
If using a cream-based product around your eyes, choose a water-based formula instead of an oil-based one.
Keep your eye closed during application to avoid makeup particles entering your eye.
Don’t apply eyeliner or eyeshadow to the inner rims of your eyelids.
Replace eye makeup at least once every 3 months to minimize the growth and spread of bacteria.
Never share eye makeup with friends or family.
Remove your contact lenses before removing your makeup.

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Stick to the Hygiene Guidelines

We can’t emphasize this enough — always thoroughly wash and dry your hands before handling your contact lenses.

Try to avoid washing your hands with oily or heavily scented hand soaps, as they tend to cling to the surface of the lens and could irritate the eye. Additionally, if you touch moisturizers or lotions before handling your contact lenses you run the risk of some residual product adhering to the lens and clouding your vision.

After washing your hands, dry them using a lint-free towel. It’s harder to grasp contact lenses with wet hands, and — as mentioned above — lenses shouldn’t come into contact with tap water.

Bonus Tip: Get an Eye Exam

While all this advice can be very helpful, it doesn’t replace an in-person exam with your eye doctor. Your eye doctor will advise you when to return for your next contact lens consultation. Following this schedule is the best way to ensure you can enjoy the freedom of contact lens wear.

If you are new to contact lenses (or not!) and have any questions or concerns about your eyes or vision, call 301-779-0844. Vision MD Eye Doctors will be happy to schedule you for a contact lens exam and fitting.

With the help of Dr. Saya Nagori, you’ll be an expert in contact lens wear and care in no time!

Call Vision MD Eye Doctors on 301-779-0844 to schedule an eye exam with our Glenn Dale optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US


Just in case you missed them, here are some of our previous blog posts :

How to Prevent Dry Eyes During Air Travel

Scleral Lenses For Keratoconus And Other Eye Conditions

What To Do if a Mosquito Bites Your Eyelid

The Future Of Contact Lenses

Coronavirus and Your Eyes – What You Should Know

As coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads around the world, health professionals are demanding that people limit their personal risk of contracting the virus by thoroughly washing their hands, practicing social distancing, and not touching their nose, mouth, or eyes. In fact, it may surprise you to learn that the eyes play an important role in spreading COVID-19. 

Coronavirus is transmitted from person to person through droplets that an infected person sneezes or coughs out. These droplets can easily enter your body through the mucous membranes on the face, such as your nose, mouth, and yes — your eyes. 

But First, What Is Coronavirus?

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, causes mild to severe respiratory illness associated with fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. Symptoms typically appear within 2 weeks of exposure. Those with acute cases of the virus can develop pneumonia and other life-threatening complications. 

Here’s what you should know: 

Guard Your Eyes Against COVID-19 

  • Avoid rubbing your eyes. Although we all engage in this very normal habit, try to fight the urge to touch your eyes. If you absolutely must, first wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. 
  • Tears carry the virus. Touching tears or a surface where tears have fallen can spread coronavirus. Make sure to wash your hands after touching your eyes and throughout the day as well.
  • Disinfect surfaces. You can catch COVID-19 by touching an object or surface that has the virus on it, such as a door knob, and then touching your eyes. 

Coronavirus and Pink Eye

Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, refers to an inflammation of the membrane covering the front of the eyeball. Conjunctivitis is characterized by red, watery, and itchy eyes. Viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can be spread by coughing and sneezing, too.

According to a recent study in China, viral conjunctivitis may be a symptom of COVID-19. The study found conjunctival congestion in 9 of the 1,099 patients (0.8%) who were confirmed to have coronavirus. 

If you suspect you have pink eye, call your eye doctor in Glenn Dale right away. Given the current coronavirus crisis, we ask patients to call prior to presenting themselves at our office, as it will allow the staff to assess your condition and adequately prepare for your visit.

Contact Lenses or Eyeglasses?

Many people who wear contact lenses are thinking about switching to eyeglasses for the time being to lower the threat of being infected with coronavirus.

Wearing glasses may provide an extra layer of protection if someone coughs on you; hopefully that infected droplet will hit the lens and not your eye. However, one must still be cautious, as the virus can reach the eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms around your frames. Unlike specialized safety goggles, glasses are not considered a safe way to prevent coronavirus.

Contact Lenses and COVID-19

If you wear contacts, make sure to properly wash your hands prior to removing or inserting them. Consider ordering a 3 to 6 month supply of contact lenses and solution; some opticals provide home delivery of contact lenses and solutions. At this stage there is no recommendation to wear daily lenses over monthlies.

Don’t switch your contact lens brand or solution, unless approved by your optometrist or optician.

Regularly Disinfect Glasses 

Some viruses such as coronavirus, can remain on hard surfaces from several hours to days. This can then be transmitted to the wearer’s fingers and face. People who wear reading glasses for presbyopia should be even more careful, because they usually need to handle their glasses more often throughout the day, and older individuals tend to be more vulnerable to COVID-19 complications. Gently wash the lenses and frames with warm water and soap, and dry your eyeglasses using a microfiber cloth. 

Stock up on Eye Medicine

It’s a good idea to stock up on important medications, including eye meds, in order to get by in case you need to be quarantined or if supplies run short. This may not be possible for everyone due to insurance limitations. If you cannot stock up, make sure to request a refill as soon as you’re due and never wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy. 

It is important that you continue to follow your doctor’s instructions for all medications.

Digital Devices and Eyestrain

At times like this, people tend to use digital devices more than usual. Take note of tiredness, sore eyes, blurry vision, double vision or headaches, which are symptoms of computer vision syndrome if they are exacerbated by extensive use of digital devices, and might indicate a need for a new prescription in the near future. This usually isn’t urgent, but if you’re unsure, you can call our eye doctor’s office.

Children and Digital Devices

During this time your children may end up watching TV and using computers, tablets and smartphones more frequently and for more extended periods too. Computer vision syndrome, mentioned above, can affect children as well. We recommend limiting screen time to a maximum of 2 hours per day for children, though it’s understandably difficult to control under the circumstances. 

Try to get your child to take a 10 to 15 minute break every hour, and stop all screen time for at least 60 minutes before sleep. 

Children and Outdoor Play

Please follow local guidelines and instructions regarding outdoor activities for your children. If possible, it’s actually good for visual development to spend 1-2 hours a day outside.

 

From all of us at Vision MD Eye Doctors in Glenn Dale, we wish you good health and please stay safe. 

Astigmatism


Astigmatism is a very common eye condition that's easily corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses and on occasion, surgery.

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What is astigmatism?

Astigmatism occurs when your eye is not entirely round. In truth, astigmatism is present in almost everyone, but it only leads to blurred vision when severe.

Think of your eye as a spherical ball. Usually, when light enters your eye it bends evenly. This creates a sharp image of what you see on the tissues at the back of your inner eye. However, if you have astigmatism, your eye is shaped more like an elliptical football. As a result, the light is not bent evenly and only one part of the picture is transmitted clearly and in focus.

Diagnosis & Treatment by Your Eye Doctor in Glenn Dale

If you experience problems with your vision, we invite you to book an eye exam at our Glenn Dale office. Our optometrist will inspect your vision and eyes to make a precise diagnosis and determine the most effective treatment. At Vision MD Eye Doctors, our Glenn Dale eye doctor is skilled and experienced in diagnosing and treating astigmatism, so that you experience crisp and clear vision.

What is a stigma?

Stigma refers to a type of refractive error known as astigmatism. There are three types of refractive error, myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The former two are more regularly referred to as nearsighted (poor distance vision) and farsighted (poor close-up vision). Astigmatism is the third category that affects both near and far vision at the same time. Much like nearsightedness or farsightedness, astigmatism is corrected using glasses or contacts.

Technically speaking, an eye with astigmatism requires two different prescriptions to correct vision in one eye due to the oval shape of the cornea. This generally requires specialized contact lenses and a more comprehensive fitting procedure.

To learn more or to correct any vision issues, book an appointment at Vision MD Eye Doctors in Glenn Dale today.

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Frequently Asked Questions - Vision Care

Q: How does astigmatism affect reading fluency?

  • A: Astigmatism can affect a child’s reading skills. If your child struggles to read, book an eye exam for your child today. Our eye doctors are here to help.

Q: What are Toric Contact Lenses?

  • A: Toric contact lenses are designed to correct astigmatism, and are custom-made for a perfect fit. Unlike standard contact lenses which are perfectly spherical, toric lenses have a more oblong shape made to accommodate the shape of the astigmatic eye. While toric lenses can be made of either soft or rigid gas permeable (RGP or GP) lens material, soft toric lenses are the more common choice.


Quality Designer Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses - Computer Glasses In Glenn Dale, MD. Visit Vision MD Eye Doctors for an eye exam and to find your perfect eyeglasses to match your style.